ME-2018v9n3 - page 4

Molecular Entomology, 2018, Vol.9, No.3, 29-34
29
Research Report Open Access
Light-trap Catch of Microlepidoptera spec. indet. in Connection with the
Gravitation Potential of Sun and Moon
Nowinszky L.
, Kiss M., Puskás J.
Eotvos Lorand University, Savaria Campus Savaria Science Centre, 9700 Szombathely Károlyi Gáspár Square 4, Hungary
Corresponding author email
:
Molecular Entomology, 2018, Vol.9, No.3 doi
:
Received: 03 Aug., 2018
Accepted: 10 Sep., 2018
Published: 12 Oct., 2018
Copyright © 2018
Nowinszky et al., This is an open access article published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits
unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Preferred citation for this article
:
Nowinszky L., Kiss M., and Puskás J., 2018, Light-trap catch of Microlepidoptera spec. indet. in connection with the gravitation potential of Sun and Moon,
Molecular Entomology, 9(3): 29-34 (doi
:
)
Abstract
This study deals with light-trap catching of Microlepidoptera spec. indet. in connection with the gravitation potential of
Sun and Moon. During seven years 590,139 moths were caught by the 49 light-traps, in 1,479 nights. We could work up 21,761
observation data. The influence of the gravitational potential of the Sun and Moon on light trapping of Microlepidoptera spec. indet.
can be verified in our examinations. When the moth flies up to height of 1 millimetre, the maximum negative or positive value of the
gravitational potential reduces or raises to 5% the energy required to fly up. Our recent work calls attention of researchers to new and
perhaps even more influential environmental factor. It is the gravitational potential of the Sun and Moon.
Keywords
Light-trap; Microlepidoptera; Sun; Moon; Gravitation
Background
Insects can use the sky polarization from the Sun and the Moon for their spatial orientation. A lots of researchers
and mainly examinations with aquatic insects deal with this theme. It has been well known since decades that the
polarized light of the sky has an important part in the orientation of certain insects. In opinion of Dacke et al.
(2003) many animals are able to use the solar polarization pattern of the sky for their orientation, but the Dung
Beetle (
Scarabeus zambesianus
Péringuey, 1901) is the first insect, who is able to use for this purpose in the
moonlight million-fold less than the brightness of the solar polarization (Dacke et al., 2003).
The polarization pattern of the sky in various sky conditions is nowadays well known thanks to the spread of
full-sky imaging polar meters. The degree of polarization is maximal along a great circle of the sky being 90
degrees from the Sun, and minimal at the Sun and anti-Sun (Horváth et al., 1998). The degree of polarization also
depends on the atmospheric conditions. In cloudy (Horváth et al., 2002) and foggy (Hegedűs et al., 2007a) skies,
as well as under canopies (Hegedűs et al., 2007b) the degree of polarization are much smaller compared to clear
skies. However the direction of polarization pattern is very robust, the typical 8-shaped pattern as well as the axis
of symmetry is well recognizable.
The direction of polarization pattern is very robust, the typical 8-shaped pattern as well as the axis of symmetry is
well recognizable. When the Sun is well below the horizon and the moonlights the atmosphere, then the axis of
symmetry is the celestial great circle containing the Moon (Gál et al., 2001; Barta et al., 2014) inspected the
transition of characteristics of sky polarization between sunlit and moonlit skies during twilight.
Researchers, however, has been as yet concentrated primarily on insects flying in daytime or at dusk and
entomologists have paid less attention to species active at night. Horváth and Varjú(2004) discovered that some
insects are able to use the polarization pattern of the sky in daytime and at dusk.
Kyba et al. (2011) found that in the bright moonlit nights in a highly polarized light bands stretching from the sky
at 90 degrees to the Moon, and has recently shown that the nocturnal organisms are able to navigate it. We did not
find any study, apart from our own one (Nowinszky et al., 2017) in the literature which investigate the
effectiveness of light trapping in the context of gravitational potential of celestial bodies.
1,2,3 5,6,7,8,9,10
Powered by FlippingBook