IJH-2018v8n17 - page 6

International Journal of Horticulture, 2018, Vol.8, No.17, 197-203
197
Research Report
Open Access
Evaluation of Fipronil 80 WG (Regent 80 WG) against Grape Thrips in
Comparison with Selected Insecticides
R.A. Balikai
Department of Agricultural Entomology University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005, Karnataka, India
Corresponding author email:
International Journal of Horticulture, 2018, Vol.8, No.17 doi:
Received: 20 Jul., 2018
Accepted: 27 Aug., 2018
Published: 28 Sept., 2018
Copyright © 2018
Balikai, This is an open access article published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits
unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Preferred citation for this article
:
Balikai R.A., 2018, Evaluation of Fipronil 80 WG (Regent 80 WG) against grape thrips in comparison with selected insecticides, International Journal of
Horticulture, 8(17): 197-203 (doi:
)
Abstract
During two consecutive seasons, the field experiments were carried out at the Horticultural Research Station, Bijapur
(Tidagundi), Karnataka, India to evaluate Fipronil 80 WG (Regent 80 WG) against grape thrips in comparison with selected
insecticides. The results revealed that, two sprays of Fipronil 80 WG @ 50 g a.i./ha provided highest protection against thrips (95.6
and 94.5% during first and second year, respectively) over untreated check followed by Fipronil 80 WG @ 40 g a.i./ha, Fipronil 5 SC
@ 40 g a.i./ha, Imidacloprid 200 SL @ 45 g a.i./ha, Spinosad 45 SC @ 84.375 g a.i./ha and Standard check (Monocrotophos 36 WSC
@ 360 g a.i./ha followed by Dimethoate 30 EC @ 521 g a.i./ha). Any of the insecticides tested did not show any type of phytotoxic
symptoms on grape vines at the dosages tried viz., Fipronil 80 WG @ 40, 50, 100, 200 g a.i./ha, Fipronil 5 SC @ 40 g a.i./ha,
Spinosad 45 SC @ 84.375 g a.i./ha, Imidacloprid 200 SL @ 45 g a.i./ha and Standard check during both the years of study. Fipronil
80 WG @ 50 g a.i./ha recorded highest yield of 10.2 and 11.6 kg/vine during first and second seasons, respectively and did not differ
statistically from Fipronil 80 WG @ 40 g a.i./ha, Spinosad 45 SC @ 84.375 g a.i./ha, Standard check, Imidacloprid 200 SL @ 45 g
a.i./ha and Fipronil 5 SC @ 40 g a.i./ha.
Keywords
Fipronil; Grapevine; Imidacloprid; Phyotoxicity; Spinosad; Thrips
Background
Grape (
Vitis vinifera
L.) is one of the most important commercial fruit crops of sub-tropical, tropical and
temperate regions of the world. In India, the states like Maharashtra, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh,
Punjab, Madhya Pradesh and Haryana are the major grape growing areas. According to the reports of Butani
(1979) more than 85 species of insect pests are noticed on grapes in India. From northern Karnataka, Balikai and
Kotikal (2003) documented 26 pests on grapevines. Among these, two insects viz., flea beetle and mealy bug were
recorded as major pests. In addition, thrips and mites also cause heavy damage affecting berry quality.
Due to continuous and indiscriminate use of synthetic insecticides, there is a development of resistance to
insecticides and hence the efficacy has become less reliable. To overcome this problem discovery of novel
insecticides with different biochemical targets are needed. New insecticidal molecules have been evaluated
against insect pests of grapevine by many researchers (Balikai, 2007; Balikai and Patil, 2007; Balikai, 2016;
Prema et al., 2016; Patil et al., 2017). Novel molecules are effective at low dosages and have less exposure in the
environment. Fipronil 80 WG is one such insecticide which was effective against thrips in grapes (Niranjana,
2008; Prema et al., 2016; Patil et al., 2017) and leaf folder in rice (Prema et al., 2017). Thus, fipronil 80 WG, a
promising Phenyl Pyrrozole insecticide was evaluated against grape thrips in comparison with selected
insecticides like imidacloprid 200 SL, spinosad 45 SC and Standard check (Monocrotophos 36 WSC @ 360 g
a.i./ha followed by Dimethoate 30 EC @ 521 g a.i./ha).
1 Materials and Methods
During two consecutive seasons of 2006-07 and 2007-08, the field experiments were carried out at the
Horticultural Research Station, Bijapur (Tidagundi), Karnataka, India with nine treatments (Table 1) and three
replications laid out in a randomized block design. The study was conducted on medium black soils with
Thompson Seedless variety which was planted at a spacing of 3.03 x 1.51 m in a telephone system. The gross and
1,2,3,4,5 7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14
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